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ORGANIZATION PROGRAMME CONTACT WHAT ? Depopulacijski Momentum, international multidisciplinary congress WHEN ? WHERE ? FOR OUR FOREIGN GUESTS
29.11.2019 – 01.12.2019. FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, ZAGREB, CROATIA
HOW MUCH IS THE ATTENDANCE
ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS PASSIVE PARTICIPANTS
50KN (6.80 EUR) 80KN + 20KN FOR TERRAIN (13.5 EUR total)
ABOUT THE CONGRESS Depopulacijski Momentum is an international multidisciplinary congress about population, space and development that will be held from November 29th to December 1th, 2019, organized by the Zagreb Geography Students Club. Through five sections and terrain in Žumberak (an emigration area close to Zagreb), the goal of the congress will be to acquaint over 150 congress participants with the problems of the population and the complexities of the current demographic situation in Croatia. In addition, an important aspect of the Congress will be connecting with key institutions and professionals, and involving students at all levels of study to encourage networking of current and future professionals with a view to establishing long-term collaboration. It is important to note that this event will be promoted on television and radio shows and in the student magazine "Ars geographica". Third section (out of 5) will be for foreign presenters and participants! 3. MIGRATIONS – A CONTEMPORARY PROCESS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE Migration—a change of place of residence—is a historic constant, present from the beginnings of human society. However, nowadays—more so than in the past—migrations form a crucial part of everyday life and have a significant influence, especially on the global labour market and demographic status of various areas. Furthermore, some of the greatest challenges Europe (as well as modern society as a whole) will face in the upcoming decades are inextricably tied to demographic trends. Those trends are, on the national and regional levels, predetermined by factors such as historic, economic, and ethno-cultural development. These factors form a basis which we can differentiate particular areas on, as well as find mutual characteristics and trends. For instance, political and socio-economic changes in post-socialist countries determined a range of mutual trends, especially those connected to emigration—e.g. freedom of movement for workers within the common European labour market has resulted in increasing numbers of migrants, mostly young people. On the other hand, these processes, characteristic of post-transition countries significantly differ in regard to those that we relate to other European countries, especially Western Europe. Population migrations (within Europe) are a combination of manifold push and pull factors. The high rate of youth unemployment, lack of education reforms, and a structural mismatch of the workforce form part of main push factors. In addition, a whole array of other general push factors aid to the increase of emigration rates: a worsening economic situation; drop in life quality; lack of jobs within certain professions, inadequate salary, etc. Attractive economic factors (pull factors) include a wider choice of jobs, higher income, better climate for entrepreneurship, and so on. The presence of such stable factors mark certain European countries as constantly attractive for potential immigration. By combining the given factors and examining Europe, for instance, certain trends can be observed—the youth emigrates from post-transition countries, especially rural areas, and heads westward in search of jobs. Key conundrums Europe (especially post-transition countries) faces are connected to finding solutions (and reasons that cause them as well) for aforementioned issues related to internal and international migrations—the focus of the section Migrations - a contemporary process of utmost importance will lie on the topic of migrations in post-transition societies, discussion, and problem-solving.
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